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Bio for Christmas

Discussion in 'Quest Diagnostics' started by anonymous, Nov 25, 2019 at 9:03 AM.

  1. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    This holiday season we’re getting a big present to unwrap. Before Christmas, BioReference Laboratories will be all ours. Thanks Santa!
     
  2. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Ho ho ho
     
  3. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    This is going to be highly entertaining when it finally happens. I hated every Bio rep that i ever encountered and our acquisition process is as brutal as it gets. Glad I’ll have a front row seat to watch. Happy Holidays.
     
  4. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    This is true of many long term reps( though not many of us left), there was a time years back where Bio hurt us and the playing field was not level. Will enjoy this as well.
     
  5. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    "There was a time"
    "playing field not even"

    Disagree. Do not blame others for self misfortune.
     
  6. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    The playing field was never even. How do you think some of the Bio reps remain employed, they were not exactly getting by with their brains.
     
  7. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Who has better reps? us or them
     
  8. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Bio has real lab reps. All very seasoned. We have pharma reps that don't know the business. Many of us will lose there jobs if this rumor is true.
     
  9. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Quest Diagnostics is a far superior company. We are in fact the industry leader in every regard. That said, Bioreference has a few choice reps that will get the red carpet treatment when the acquisition is officially announced. And Dean L is absolutely at the top of that list. He’s knowledgeable, professional, very experienced and quite charismatic. There will always be room for a superstar like Dean on our team.
     
  10. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    It's a mixed bag. Quest still has some very competent long terms reps around that understanding relationships and selling. Many have been lost over the years due to age discrimination and poor leadership. The rest are as you say pharma reps. Bio also has some capable folks, but many have become dependent on non compliant activity.
     
  11. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    You are speculating on what might happen if a "rumor is true"
     
  12. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    For Quest, this would be like coal in their stocking...or worse.
     
  13. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Not happening
     
  14. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Unless you are at the highest level of leadership at Quest, you know less than nothing about acquisition plans, and to spread unfounded rumors about publicly traded companies in a forum like this is highly risky. Stop.
     
  15. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Well that's why they are called rumors right?
     
  16. anonymous

    anonymous Guest


    You are correct, they are just rumors.

    I could only assume the poster was referring to a possible securities fraud, including potential market manipulation in his assumptions of the rumors posted here. Boy that's a reach.

    The SEC moves usually to protect the market from false rumors and certain short-selling. Their expansion of existing examinations of registered broker-dealers and investment advisers were aimed at the prevention of the intentional spread of false information intended to manipulate securities prices. This was designed to cover a broad spectrum of market participants.

    This is usually conducted by the Commission’s Office of Compliance Inspections and Examinations, and, together with similar examinations by FINRA and NYSE Regulation.

    One way fraudsters may exploit social media is to engage in a market manipulation, such as spreading false and misleading information about a company to affect the stock’s share price. Wrongdoers may perpetuate stock rumors on social media, as well as on online bulletin boards and in Internet chat rooms.

    There is a big difference between basic rumors circulating from person to person and pertaining to an object, event, or issue in public concern vs one that's circulated fraudulently for the purpose of manipulating the share price. So unless your posting rumors abroad for the purpose of short selling or pump n dump, that would not apply here.

    Examples that would.

    In a recent Enforcement action, SEC v. Craig, the SEC accused an individual of manipulating the share prices of two publicly traded companies by tweeting false and misleading information. The defendant allegedly tweeted rumors that federal law enforcement was investigating a technology company for fraud, and that a biopharmaceutical company had tainted drug trial results and a federal government agency seized its papers. The SEC asserted that these deceptive tweets were made from Twitter accounts mimicking established securities research firms. The hoaxes allegedly caused investors to lose more than $1.5 million.

    In SEC v. McKeown and Ryan, the SEC obtained judgments against a Canadian couple who used their website (PennyStockChaser), Facebook, and Twitter to pump up the stock of microcap companies, and then profited by selling shares of those companies. The couple allegedly received millions of shares of these companies as compensation and sold the shares around the time that their website predicted the stock price would massively increase (a practice known as “scalping”). The SEC’s complaint alleged that the couple did not fully disclose the compensation they received for touting the stocks. The court ordered the couple and their companies to pay more than $3.7 million in disgorgement for profits gained as a result of the alleged conduct, and ordered the couple to pay $300,000 in civil penalties.
     
  17. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Thank you Leo Tolstoy for your version of "Quest- War and Peace". Get a f***ing life!
     
  18. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    You two need to get a room and enjoy the spews of your labors.
     
  19. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Interesting, speaking of Leo Tolstoy.

    Russian author Leo Tolstoy wrote the acclaimed novels 'War and Peace,' 'Anna Karenina' and 'The Death of Ivan Ilyich,' and ranks among the world's top writers.
    Who Was Leo Tolstoy?
    In the 1860s, Russian author Leo Tolstoy wrote his first great novel, War and Peace. In 1873, Tolstoy set to work on the second of his best-known novels, Anna Karenina. He continued to write fiction throughout the 1880s and 1890s. One of his most successful later works was The Death of Ivan Ilyich.

    Early Life
    On September 9, 1828, writer Leo Tolstoy was born at his family's estate, Yasnaya Polyana, in the Tula Province of Russia. He was the youngest of four boys. When Tolstoy's mother died in 1830, his father's cousin took over caring for the children. When their father, Count Nikolay Tolstoy, died just seven years later, their aunt was appointed their legal guardian. When the aunt passed away, Tolstoy and his siblings moved in with a second aunt, in Kazan, Russia. Although Tolstoy experienced a lot of loss at an early age, he would later idealize his childhood memories in his writing.

    Tolstoy received his primary education at home, at the hands of French and German tutors. In 1843, he enrolled in an Oriental languages program at the University of Kazan. There, Tolstoy failed to excel as a student. His low grades forced him to transfer to an easier law program. Prone to partying in excess, Tolstoy ultimately left the University of Kazan in 1847, without a degree. He returned to his parents' estate, where he made a go at becoming a farmer. He attempted to lead the serfs, or farmhands, in their work, but he was too often absent on social visits to Tula and Moscow. His stab at becoming the perfect farmer soon proved to be a failure. He did, however, succeed in pouring his energies into keeping a journal — the beginning of a lifelong habit that would inspire much of his fiction.

    As Tolstoy was flailing on the farm, his older brother, Nikolay, came to visit while on military leave. Nikolay convinced Tolstoy to join the Army as a junker, south in the Caucasus Mountains, where Nikolay himself was stationed. Following his stint as a junker, Tolstoy transferred to Sevastopol in Ukraine in November 1854, where he fought in the Crimean War through August 1855.

    Early Works
    During quiet periods while Tolstoy was a junker in the Army, he worked on an autobiographical story called Childhood. In it, he wrote of his fondest childhood memories. In 1852, Tolstoy submitted the sketch to The Contemporary, the most popular journal of the time. The story was eagerly accepted and became Tolstoy's very first published work.

    After completing Childhood, Tolstoy started writing about his day-to-day life at the Army outpost in the Caucasus. However, he did not complete the work, entitled The Cossacks, until 1862, after he had already left the Army.
     
  20. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    This is one f'd up company.
    You a holes are clowns.
    Wouldn't work at your dump... ever