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Pension - Lump Sum Buyout Offer

Discussion in 'Johnson & Johnson' started by anonymous, Oct 2, 2019 at 7:14 PM.

  1. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    J&J absolutely does lump sum pension payouts. 100% positive on this topic. Just rolled mine over
    into an IRA. I don't trust this company with my finances. To each his own.
     

  2. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    You did the right thing, I don’t know why anyone would ever take a monthly check vs lump sum regardless of company. The sad reality is many people don’t trust themselves with THEIR OWN MONEY.
     
  3. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    How would your move worked out during an absolute tanking of the market as it's doing right now??
     
  4. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    J&J has never done lump sum pensions. If that is so now when did it start???
     
  5. anonymous

    anonymous Guest


    Horribly, but if you’re in your 50’s it’s a long term play.
     
  6. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    New to this forum. In march 2020 was told by benefits dept. There is no longer a lump sum buyout option.
    But I have a question. Anyone know anything about retroactive pmts from a pension plan...a particular employee knew nothing about? Who is in "charge" of making a decision such as paying retroactive pmts to a retired employee?? Please help.
     
  7. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

     
  8. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    I was told march 2020. No lump sum offers of pension plan. Only pmts (annuity) is this true??
     
  9. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    YES100% JnJ does offer buyouts of pension plans. If you get opportunity take the lump sum payment! Gain advice from a CFP and they will tell yes .
    I
     
  10. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Yea, take the lump sum & invest it in the stock market LOL
     
  11. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Worked in various positions for decades and retired a few years ago. Pensions were never before that time or during that time given out in a lump sum unlike other companies like Merck. Perhaps at an extremely high executive level but not for the masses in any department's.
     
  12. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    what is the current pension formula? is it a percent of pay based on years of service?
     
  13. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    exclusive of SS adjustment it is 0.0155 x yrs x last 5 year avg salary. Prior to a certain year it was 0.0175, great calculator on oursource In pension section under benefits. Considers SS and all factors and options.
     
  14. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

     
  15. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    I took my lump sum in 2017 from JNJ, so I assure you that your information is bad. It was offered after I turned 55. Did the same when I worked for another pharma. Would do it again in a heartbeat. Turned it over to Fidelity IRA and I'm happy.
     
  16. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    the terms of your pension options are dependent on your years service (the conditions of the pension program when you enrolled). I retired after 29years and my options did not include a lump sum. Recently it has been changed to only lump sum payout but again depending on your start date.
     
  17. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    If you look at the S&P 500 rate of return over 30 yrs or longer it’s a 12% rate of return. Estimating 10% annually is about right. Some yrs more, some yrs less....but over time 10-12% annually is an average rate of return. What you want to avoid is having a few million tucked away a year or 2 from retirement, be heavily invested in stocks, and experience a downturn. The closer to retirement you are, the greater the need to re-balance a portfolio into bonds and other safer investments....in order to protect that nest egg....but you won’t get 10% at that time either.