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say no to transporting o2 in your vehicle. it's pure insanity

Discussion in 'Pacific Pulmonary Services' started by Anonymous, Jun 17, 2011 at 7:02 PM.

  1. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    •Transporting cylinders in cars, vans, or in any enclosed vehicle is extremely dangerous, and should be avoided. Never transport flammable gases in the trunk or passenger compartment of a vehicle. Many persons disregard this warning every year, and there are many vehicle explosions as a result. We urge you to have the cylinders delivered in an appropriate vehicle.
    •Always install the protective cap on the cylinders when they are being transported, or any time they are not in use. Many cylinders contain pressures that are in excess of 2000 pounds per square inch. A broken valve is all it takes for the cylinder to become an unguided missile. If the cylinders were not designed to accept a protective cap over the valve, special care must be taken to prevent the valve from damage or opening during transportation.
    •Secure your cylinders. The Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations require that all compressed gas cylinders be secured from movement during transportation. Cylinders that can move can open accidentally, or roll off the vehicle into the path of oncoming traffic.
    •Leaving cylinders near a source of heat, such as a furnace or water heater, or inside a vehicle is an invitation for disaster. Keep the cylinders in a cool, well ventilated area, away from sources of heat or ignition.
     
  2. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Wait.. your not willing to throw caution to the wind?? YOUR FIRED!!!!!!!!!!
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Seriously? I am now not only embarassed, but ashamed to still work for this company... Somebody please put put us out of our misery.
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    word of advice, reference the DOT. this is an illegal practice that is forced upon PCC's. PPS is breaking the law every time. this is the truth, there's no wiggle room. if tanks are transported in a personal vehicle you are breaking a federal law.
     
  5. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    C'mon, PPS is "immune" to federal laws, you didn't know that? lol
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    PPS RULES!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
     
  7. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    DOT also requires a hazardous materials manifest for anyone transporting cylinders. The fine; $300 per EACH CYLINDER!
     
  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    At this point do you think they really care?

    DUH!
     
  9. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    true. amazing how uninformed pcc's are. have fun being pps' bitches
     
  10. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Desperate times, call for desperate measures, don't get caught..

    SUCKERS!!!!!
     
  11. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    no jason said it would not be a problem. right? whats the deal for real? their not paying me enough for this anyway. what gives??
     
  12. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I was terminated for refusing to deliver liquid O2 in my personal vehicle last week!! PCC's beware this company is desperate for any sales and they are not servicing vent patients on purpose in hopes they will go to another provider!! Vent patients report them to insurance provider!
     
  13. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    has your dm provided this information to you before forcing you to transport a f&cking missile in your car? you guys have no idea what kind of danger you're putting yourself in. plus, your insurance WILL NOT COVER ANY DAMAGES. check out the website and info below. interested to hear what you have to say

    http://www.bnl.gov/esh/shsd/Programs/Program_Area_HazMat_Transportation_FAQ.asp

    Q: Can I transport a compressed gas cylinder in my car trunk?

    A: No. You may not transport a standard compressed gas cylinder (i.e., the 4.5 ft. tall cylinders) in the trunk of your car on-site or off-site. Compressed gas cylinders must be transport in a government vehicle and secured in that vehicle in accordance with OSHA regulations. This includes using a vehicle equipped with a cylinder rack, the main cylinder valve must be tightly closed and the cylinder cap must be properly installed. See your POC or SME for information on transporting “lecture bottles” of compressed gases.



    Compressed gas cylinders are hazardous items because if the cylinder or its valve sustains damage, the cylinder may explode or become a projectile. In addition, the gases themselves may be either highly flammable, toxic, an oxidizer, or a combination of two or more hazards. Therefore, the federal Department of Transportation regulates the manner in which compressed gas cylinders may be transported upon public roads, for the protection of the driver as well as the public at large.

    Type Of Vehicle

    A vehicle which is used to transport compressed gas cylinders should have a storage area which is open to the atmosphere and has a flat floor or platform for the cylinders to set on. Optionally, the vehicle may have a rack or racks which secure the cylinders against movement, in lieu of a flat floor or platform.

    Cylinder Restraint

    The cylinders must be restrained from movement whether placed upon a floor or in racks or boxes. Cylinders may be transported in an upright or horizontal position. However, any cylinder which has a safety pressure release valve must be transported in such position that the valve is not submerged in the liquid contents of the cylinder.

    Transportation

    The vehicle must proceed directly from the point of origin to the delivery destination. Also, the vehicle is prohibited from entering any tunnel while transporting cylinders.
     
  14. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I really, really hope that you have retained a good lawyer and have some type of proof that this is what you were fired for. I was fired for not participating in some shady reimbursement practices and I have wished so many times that I had followed through with a lawsuit. At the time I just needed to get a job and I was stressed out from weeks of my manager making my life miserable, hoping I would quit. Anyway, if you have any documentation at all....use it!!!
     
  15. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    The poor ventilator patients, that is a crime in itself! This company doesn't care about too many does it?
     
  16. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Your website is specific to a DOE research site; BNL. The rules are internal to that site, and do not necessarily apply to transporting cylinders in your car.
    That having been said, if you car insurance company ever finds out, kiss your insurance good bye-along with the chance of any other company insuring your vehicle.
     
  17. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    thanks for your insight. you say it doesn't necessarily apply to transporting cylinders in pcc's car but could it apply? what could i say to my dm that would protect me from being terminated? i have zero desire to transport tanks. i've had one tank tip over in my back seat and it sounded like a bomb exploded. no damage but it shook me up. i find it ironic that my tech follows protocol but i don't have to.

    also, if an incident occurs and i make a claim to my insurance company they would deny it and drop my policy? you also claim that no other insurance company would cover me. is this because my present insurer would flag me as high risk?
     
  18. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Suck it up. If you have in the backseat and secure and not bouncing around like your stuff from shopping on company time, it is all good.
     
  19. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    That's right. It's called a seatbelt folks. Man, no wonder PPS has let so many people go. They are NOT very bright.
     
  20. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    What an ignorant buffoon-seatbelt? Just how do you secure an E cylinder in a seatbelt? A LOX HCV? Typical PPS management-totally clueless about the business they are in, and rationalizing how it is OK to break laws!

    Should you get in an accident and the oxygen contributes anything to it, expect no insurance to cover anything, everything about the accident will be your responsibility, and hefty fines are sure to come your way. You have 2 choices to mitigate this; 1. do not carry oxygen in your vehicle; 2. contact your insurance company and get coverage for driving your vehicle for work AND carrying hazardous materials. Option 2 will likely cost you over $500 per month IF your driving record is clean AND you have a method to secure the cylinders/HCVs within the vehicle that is compliant with CGA guidelines.