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What Happened to the Infusion Pumps?

Discussion in 'Hospira' started by anonymous, Nov 26, 2015 at 12:25 PM.

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  1. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Walmart will beat their offer.
     
  2. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Still no sale? What is Pfizer going to do now?
     
  3. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Someone needs to buy lol
     
  4. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    RIP san diego.
     
  5. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    RIP bloated sales and Manufacturing.
    ICU is a lean machine
     
  6. weathersby

    weathersby new user

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    Any news on what ICU plans to do with Hospira's distribution network? Word came through management that, with the acquisition, ICU also gains ownership over most of Hospira's distribution network, even though I see no proof of that in any of Pfizer's/ICU press releases, nor in any media outlet. I'm fairly sure I know what this means, just throwing this out there in case anyone from any of Hospira's DC's care to comment.
     
  7. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Their IQ is too low to respond with logical answer. The DCs are history and ICU inventory makes up less than 5% of product. You sound clueless yourself bud, probably a grunt From a DC looking for a miracle LMAO

    HR
     
  8. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    The Hospira infusion pump business was sold to ICU for $1 billion in October. This is either a $1 billion or 500 million shortfall, depending on whether you believed that it was worth $2 billion or $1.5 billion, as was announced in the press releases. What is the view from Wall street? Is Pfizer happy?
     
  9. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    I think the 1.5bn or 2bn was a bloated figure. Hospira will be pulling the plug on many skus soon son, ICUs read through and paid the right price.
     
  10. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Why remove those SKUs (product numbers) if they are worth up to 1 billion? Sounds like they were forced to.
    Bet those SKUs begin with a P.
     
  11. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Here is an update:

    ICU Medical (NSDQ:ICUI) this week closed its $900 million acquisition of the Hospira infusion pump business from Pfizer (NYSE:PFE), confirming last year’s rumors that the drug giant was looking to sell the business.

    The deal, which was scaled back from $1 billion last month, called for ICU Medical to offer 3.2 million new shares, or $419.3 million, and $275 million in cash, along with an additional possible $225 million in cash based on performance milestones through the end of 2019. The transaction will put Hospira’s infusion systems business, including IV pumps, solutions, disposables and “certain other assets” in ICU Medical’s hands, while Pfizer will hold a 16.6% stake in ICU.
     
  12. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    and life goes on like normal.....unless you work in one of the main warehouses, then it's ruh-roh
     
  13. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    We were all canned on a conference call. No joke
     
  14. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Hospira in Morgan Hill was the most dysfunctional company I ever worked for. People wouldn't even shake your hands on the first day or even say "Good Morning" to you. You were treated like you are there to take their jobs.

    Most projects got cut at the 90% completion point, I noticed. Unlike the norm for Silicon Valley, it was rare to see a project go from start to finish. Even if you made a personal effort by giving up your weekends and working late, you never made it to the end before the plug got pulled by management. It seems like the idea was for one group of "temps" to do the heavy plowing and planting for "permanents" to do the harvesting. The problem with this scheme, known by anyone who has ever worked in product development, is the "almost finished" project will be left with lousy or even no documentation, since this activity is usually done at the end, when everything is finalized

    Many of us take pride in our ability to finish the job and wanted out even without the encouragement of Project Fuel, which was an excuse to make drastic cuts in the payroll to report greater earnings for the stock price. When the Recession final lifted, people jumped ship and the rest is history. The "pull the plug at the 90% point of the project" was a bad idea.

    Of course this is all fictional - all resemblance to reality is purely coincidental.
     
  15. anonymous

    anonymous Guest

    Kind of surprised there was not a thread created to discuss the firing of the entire salesforce by Vivek of ICU Medical over a conference call.