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Do physicians gossip about sales reps?

Discussion in 'Ask Dr. Dave' started by Anonymous, Feb 19, 2015 at 3:15 PM.

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  1. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I ask this question because sales reps are notorious for gossiping about physicians in the field. Some good gossip and some bad. Mostly funny stories about their interactions with their physician customers. I was just wondering if doctors do the same thing when you have social interactions with one another? Do you find that those in your profession gossip about individual sales reps or tells funny stories about their interactions with reps? I've often wondered if the door swings in both directions?
     

  2. DrDave

    DrDave Member

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    Not really that much. Frankly, I probably tell more drug rep anecdotes to other drug reps than physicians. Usually, they are about reps who no longer call on me, though.

    Of course, I don't blame you for doing so. Physicians are an odd bunch. In fact, some of my favorite "drug rep stories" are not really about drug reps but rather physician behavior at drug rep events. I'm sure you see some crazy stuff. I know I have.
     
  3. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Most medical doctors I know consider drug reps to be a necessary evil. Most docs are extremely busy in their practices (unlike drug reps) and probably have little spare time to gossip about drug reps, even if they had the inclination to do so (and most probably wouldn't even if they had the time). It actually takes brains to become a physician. :)
     
  4. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    See does...lots of brains/washing. Get it? Brainwashing. Brainswashing. LOL.

    The older I get, the more I see a failed healthcare system that feed the cows in this world drugs that don't solve long-term problems. People just do whatever their MD suggests, which is stupid, compared to learning about prevention and only going to an MD when it is absolutely necessary, which is going to happen only a handful of times in one's life.

    Doctors are book smart, and that is as far as I will go with them. Most are terrible at business. Most have big ego (not a sign of being smart). And the worst part is that about half don't even care about their patients (and that number might be much higher).

    Sorry for the downer, but I think most of what I wrote is accurate.
     
  5. DrDave

    DrDave Member

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    My only modest disagreement, based on my experience - I find that many patients don't follow my advice, and a lot of the advice given in my office is preventive/lifestyle advice that you seem to be advocating.

    Nevertheless, I'll add that, also in my experience, many are terrible at business and yet have such big egos they feel they know more about the business of medicine than those formally trained in it (e.g., CEOs, CFOs, etc.). They confuse the practice of medicine with the business of medicine.

    Thanks for your post!
     
  6. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    Excellent response, Dr. Dave.

    What the previous poster doesn't understand is that the average MD did not make the rules that apply to modern medicine and is not responsible for the failed healthcare system in America. The politicians in Washington DC and the Harvard educated MBA CEO's of the major insurance companies make the rules that the common physician is either obligated to obey or risk losing his licence to practice medicine. The physicians don't control the pharmaceutical companies that make the drugs or the FDA. MD's are given their marching orders by the Ivy League MBA brats and are expected to carry them out.

    Oh, and your average MD makes one heck of an investment to get a medical license, unlike a pharma sales monkey who goes from office to office peddling his company's products. A doctor had to shine as an undergrad to get a shot at medical school - then enter into 4 years of grinding competitive scholarship, an internship and a low-paid residency to secure the right hang out a shingle and make a living. Most MD's have to pay off huge education loans of $400,000 or more upon entering a medical practice.

    Oh, and as far as business acumen goes, if you trained for most of your life to be an engineer could I reasonably expect you to also be an expert in the field of anthropology? Accordingly, high expectations of a medical doctor having Warren Buffet business skills is so very stupid it hurts.

    Personally I'm perplexed why a man or woman with the brain power to become a physician even considers medicine as an occupation in this day and age. It must be torture to have some MBA bean counter in an insurance company dicate how you will practice a trade that it took you 11 years or longer to learn. Very few physicians I have spoken with about their chosen profession would ever suggest their children to follow in their footsteps. Who needs all that responsibility, liability, long hours, paperwork, continued education, listening to patient complaints day after day, etc...

    Oh, and all of my previous and current family physicians have emphasized preventative medicine. Each recommended that I follow a specific healthy lifestyle (diet, exercise, stress reduction, etc...) to promote a long and quality life. HOWEVER IT IS MY CHOICE WHETHER TO FOLLOW THOSE RECOMMENDATIONS OR NOT!

    I thank the Lord that there are still people like you, Dr. Dave, who are willing to sacrafice and share your talents so that we can get competent treatment when we fall ill. The previous poster may not appreciate that. Trust me. I do.
     
  7. DrDave

    DrDave Member

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    Thank you for those flattering and empathetic comments. I'm not sure they are all deserved, but they are appreciated!

    Of all the challenges you cite, the staggering debt of medical education is probably the major reason I would be wary of my children going into medicine today. As marketable as medical skills are, debt is a burden that will make one's life miserable. The bigger the debt, the greater the misery.

    As far as I am concerned, though, I still go to work each day feeling fortunate. With the magnitude of misfortune I see each day, it's hard to complain about my professional situation. Physicians in toxic work environments or who feel otherwise unfulfilled may differ, but my response would be that there are few professionals who have the freedom to change positions that physicians do.

    Are there more day to day nuisances than when I started? Absolutely. For example, I'll be the first in line to rant about a prior authorization process that forces physicians to complete lengthy forms without any certainty of whether the correct PBM has been identified, what the suitable alternatives may be that would avoid the trouble, etc. The completion of tedious forms seems a wasteful use of professionals who spent 11-15 years in training. This goes for FMLA forms, disability forms, etc.

    That said, as one of my mentors advised me 20 years ago, if everything you do takes a little piece of you, you will burn out in no time. However, if you find a little something you can take away from each patient interaction for yourself - a lesson, wisdom, gratitude, etc. - you can do this as long as you like. He's been right so far.

    Thanks again for your post!
     
  8. Anonymous

    Anonymous Guest

    I totally understand why some who would make great physicians decide to enter other vocational fields. Student debt of half a million dollars at graduation would certainly make me look at other options. I think the european system is better. Over there qualified applicants get their tuition and fees paid by the government. Sure, they don't have the same income as American doctors but they still make good livings. Graduating from medical school debt free would be a big plus. Also, it would attract more candidates who have a sincere interest in medicine and treating sick people - rather than those with aspirations to just get rich.